Fieldwork

U.S. scientists travel to Antarctica, Greenland, Alaska, and other glaciated regions around the world to conduct fieldwork in some of the harshest conditions on Earth. Below you can find information about current IDP-supported fieldwork. You can also view information about upcoming fieldwork as well as completed fieldwork.

2021 Arctic

  • North America: Sediment Transport Mechanisms and Geomorphic Processes Associated with Shore Ice along Cold Climate Coastlines

    This project will test the hypothesis that limited or variable shore ice cover, when compared to consistent shore ice cover, results in enhanced storm-induced coastal erosion and damage to coastal infrastructure. Cold climate coastlines are highly vulnerable to reduced winter ice cover in response to climate change. The dynamics of how reduced ice cover influences coastal evolution is poorly understood which inhibits accurate forecasting of future coastal response in cold climates. Researchers on this project hope to improve our understanding of how sediment interacts with shore ice as well as the resulting coastal landscape change. The first part of the project involves laboratory experiments aimed at studying the physics of sediment and ice interactions. The second part of the project will gather field measurements that use the laboratory measurements as a basis to investigate how cold climate coastlines naturally respond to the shore ice. Using a SIPRE Hand Auger, the researchers will collect ice core samples of 1-3 meters in length on Lake Michigan and Lake Superior to inspect debris entrained within the ice for comparison with the laboratory experiments. This research will result in a model that will help explain how reduced and variable winter shore ice cover alters the coastal landscape, which will help coastal managers proactively plan for future climate change impacts.

    Point of Contact:

    Lucas Zoet, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ethan Theuerkauf, Michigan State University.

    Schedule: 12/01/2020 - 03/31/2021
    Equipment: SIPRE Hand Auger
  • Greenland: Climate Drivers and Ancient History in Greenland Ice

    Using the Foro 400 Drill, this project will drill a 400-450 meter long ice core from the Tunu region of northeast Greenland and analyze the core for a broad range of elements, chemical species, and isotopes to reconstruct climate and human impacts during the past ~4000 years. An ice-penetrating radar survey extending 40-km upstream along the ice-flow line upstream of the ice-core site will support interpretation of the aerosol and water isotope records, as well as understanding of any possible impacts from changes in deposition processes upstream. The goal of this research is to develop accurately dated, high-resolution, ice-core records of a broad range of elements and chemical species to expand and extend recently identified, causal linkages between (1) ancient societies; (2) volcanism and hydroclimate; and (3) wars, plagues, social unrest, and economic activity.

    Point of Contact:

    Joseph McConnell, Desert Research Institute.

    Schedule: 5/29/2021 - 7/1/2021 (estimated)
    Equipment: Foro 400 Drill
  • Southeast Greenland Surface Mass Balance

    Using the Stampfli Drill and a hand auger and Sidewinder, this project will drill shallow firn cores from 2-3 sites in Southeast Greenland. The goal of the project is to investigate decadal variability in accumulation and surface melt intensity and investigate the impact of this variability on Helheim Glacier behavior. The researchers plan to revisit two sites that they last drilled in 2003 as well as an additional lower elevation site as time/resources allow. All drilling will be done during day trips from Kulusuk supported by Twin Otter.

    Point of Contact:

    Sarah Das, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

    Schedule: 4/14/2021 - 4/30/2021 (estimated)