News

2023 COLDEX Interdisciplinary Oldest Ice Science Short Course for Early Career Researchers - First Circular

This two-day short course, organized by the Center for Oldest Ice Exploration (COLDEX; https://coldex.org/), will introduce early career ice core researchers to the various subfields that contribute to the search for, and study of, very old ice, including relevant aspects of Antarctic geologic history, paleoclimatology, glaciology, and ice core chemistry. In addition, participants will learn about communicating old ice science to the public, media and policy makers.

Researchers from the Center for Oldest Ice Exploration and/or invited visitors will present these topics via lectures and interactive activities. Background material including introductory reading and on-line lectures will be provided beforehand to allow more time for in-depth discussions.

The short course will be held from the evening of May 10 through May 12 at Camp Casey on Whidbey Island, Washington, USA (https://casey.spu.edu/) immediately after the US Ice Core Open Science meeting held May 8-10 in Seattle (https://herculesdome.org/us-ice-core-open-science-meeting-2023). Lodging at Camp Casey and all meals will be covered by COLDEX. Transportation by van to Camp Casey from the Open Science meeting venue will be arranged for participants, with transport back to Seattle on Saturday May 13.

Participants not attending the Open Science meeting can arrange to meet the vans in Seattle or arrange their own transport to Camp Casey. While we expect many participants will already be traveling to the Open Science meeting, funds for transportation from home institutions can be requested.

Eligible participants: Graduate students and postdocs working on ice core science or related research. Financial support is limited to postdocs and students at US institutions.

Number of attendees: Approximately 30. If oversubscribed, preference may be given to participants from COLDEX institutions.

Organizing Committee: Michelle Koutnik (University of Washington), John Goodge (University of Minnesota-Duluth), TJ Fudge (University of Washington), Nick Holscuh (Amherst College), Kristen Rahilly (Oregon State University), Christo Buizert (Oregon State University), Heidi Roop (University of Minnesota-Twin Cities), Ed Brook (Oregon State University).

To help in planning, please indicate your interest in attending by filling out this form by March 1: https://forms.gle/Lpg3oJB3yhZZ14nZ9

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Dr. Kristen Rahilly, she/her
Director for Education Center for Oldest Ice Exploration, COLDEX
coldex.org

Fall 2022 Ice Bits Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2022 quarterly update of U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) activities is now available at:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-fall

Topics include:

  • 2022 Arctic, Peru, and North American Fieldwork Completed
  • Field Support to Antarctic 2022-2023 Projects
  • Ice Core Articles for Undergraduate Students and Ice Core-Adjacent Researchers
  • School of Ice 2023 Workshop
  • IDP Education Resources Selected for Inclusion in CLEAN
  • Center for Oldest Ice Exploration (COLDEX) REU Program
  • Ice Core Sessions at AGU Fall Meeting
  • Stay Connected with IDP
  • Acknowledgment of IDP in Publications
  • Ice Drilling Support for NSF Polar Proposals

To view the newsletter, please go to:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-fall

Call for Nominations: Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Ice Drilling Program

The Science Advisory Board (SAB) of the U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) invites nominations, including self-nominations, from the scientific community to fill four open positions on the IDP-SAB. The SAB seeks to maintain expertise in subglacial science, glacial geophysics, ice borehole science, and cryomicrobiology. Nominees must be U.S.-based scientists whose research relies on analysis of evidence from within and below ice sheets and glaciers. The primary purpose of the SAB is to represent the research community in providing advice and input on scientific issues affecting drilling and coring efforts of the IDP. SAB members typically serve for four years, participate in the annual SAB meeting, and collaborate remotely as needed. SAB members work with the standing working groups to prioritize community needs.

* Please send nominations and expressions of interest to Icedrill@Dartmouth.edu by November 17, 2022. *

Call for Nominations: Ice Core Working Group of the U.S. Ice Drilling Program

The Ice Core Working Group (ICWG) of the U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) invites nominations, including self-nominations, from the scientific community to fill two open positions on the ICWG. The ICWG seeks to maintain expertise in understanding ice core evidence from trapped atmospheric gases and from volcanic records. Nominees must be U.S. based scientists whose science relies on analysis of ice or firn cores. The ICWG is one of three working groups of the IDP Science Advisory Board (SAB). The primary purpose of the ICWG is to provide advice and input on scientific issues pertaining to ice cores to the SAB and to the IDP. ICWG members typically serve for three years, attend the annual ICWG meeting, and collaborate remotely as needed.

* Please send nominations and expressions of interest to Icedrill@Dartmouth.edu by November 8, 2022. *

Summer 2022 Ice Bits Newsletter Now Available

The Summer 2022 quarterly update of U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) activities is now available at:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-summer

Topics include:

  • ASIG Drill Departs Madison for Upcoming GreenDrill Project
  • Equipment Testing in Full Swing
  • IDP Welcomes New Field Support Manager Jess Ackerman
  • IDP Ice Drilling Community Survey
  • 2022-2032 Long Range Science and Long Range Drilling Technology Plans Updated
  • IDP Education and Public Outreach Update Summer 2022
  • Stay Connected with IDP
  • Acknowledgment of IDP in Publications
  • Ice Drilling Support for NSF Polar Proposals

To view the newsletter, please go to:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-summer

2022 Long Range Science Plan and Long Range Drilling Technology Plan Now Available

The purpose of the plans is to articulate goals and make recommendations for the direction for U.S. ice coring and drilling science, and for the development of drilling technology, infrastructure and logistical support needed to enable the science.

Long Range Science Plan

Long Range Drilling Technology Plan

Spring 2022 Ice Bits Newsletter Now Available

The Spring 2022 quarterly update of U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) activities is now available at:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-spring

Topics include:

  • IDP Welcomes Two New Mechanical Engineers
  • Current and Upcoming Field Support
  • IDP Education and Public Outreach Update Spring 2022
  • Basal Access and Sampling Feasibility Study – New White Paper from IDP
  • Ice Core Working Group 2022 Meeting
  • Science Advisory Board 2022 Meeting
  • Stay Connected with IDP
  • Acknowledgment of IDP in Publications
  • Ice Drilling Support for NSF Polar Proposals

To view the newsletter, please go to:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2022-spring

Request for Community Input — DRAFT 2022 Long Range Science Plan

Each year in the spring, the Ice Drilling Program (IDP) works with its Science Advisory Board and the research community to update the Long Range Science Plan. This Plan identifies the science in the coming decade that will require the use of ice drilling technology and expertise for the community. This also drives the formation of other plans, for example, the Long Range Drilling Technology Plan. The plans provide the basis for multi‐annual planning for the actions and drill development projects of IDP and others, and the plans give the funding agencies advance notice of upcoming community science needs.

If you need an ice core or a hole drilled in a glacier or ice sheet in the coming decade or a rock core from under shallow glacial ice, please make sure that the high‐level articulation of your science is captured in the current draft update of the Long Range Science Plan!

Please read through the draft Long Range Science Plan and send corrections, updates, or additions to Icedrill@Dartmouth.edu ASAP or not later than May 27, 2022. When sending corrections/updates, please also reference the appropriate line number in the draft Long Range Science Plan where the correction/update is needed.

Submission deadline: May 27, 2022

To download the working draft, visit:
https://icedrill.org/long-range-science-plan

Winter 2021/22 Ice Bits Newsletter Now Available

The Winter 2021/22 quarterly update of U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) activities is now available at:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2021-2022-winter

Topics include:

  • Cold Wisconsin Winter and a Local Lake Enable Drill Testing and Training
  • IDP Successfully Tests New Fusion Welder System for Borehole Casing
  • 700 Drill Fabrication Approved
  • IDP Hires New Electrical Engineer and Seeks a New Field Support Manager and Mechanical Engineer(s)
  • Announcing School of Ice - Summer 2022
  • Save the Date - US Ice Core Open Science Meeting, May 24-26, 2022
  • Stay Connected with IDP
  • Acknowledgment of IDP in Publications
  • Ice Drilling Support for NSF Polar Proposals

To view the newsletter, please go to:
https://icedrill.org/icebits/2021-2022-winter

Field Support Manager Job Opening at IDP Madison, WI, USA

The U.S. Ice Drilling Program (IDP) is seeking a Field Support Manager!

This position is based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and supports field work funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The team in Madison is small and is composed of engineers and support staff who design, assemble, test, and ultimately operate ice and rock coring drills in polar and glacial environments all over the world! The Field Support Manager works closely with IDP customers (U.S. scientists) and with NSF polar logistics contractors to plan for support of field science projects and to coordinate cargo shipments to and from the polar regions. In this exciting and fulfilling opportunity, you will find yourself busy coordinating and executing exciting field projects in both the Arctic and Antarctic and anywhere in between! For more information about the U.S. Ice Drilling Program, please visit us at https://icedrill.org/!

The selected candidate will be required to periodically deploy to remote camps in the polar regions for 1-3 month periods to provide technical support and field operation of equipment.

To understand our world and the universe, the IDP group within the UW-Madison Space Science & Engineering Center develops and deploys drilling systems to support the U.S. scientific community's research across the world in polar and glacial regions. IDP's history of deploying a diverse set of ice drilling and coring systems, rock drills, and associated support equipment ranges from small hand-held drills to rigs that drill through thousands of meters of ice to retrieve rock cores.

The selected candidate will work closely with multidisciplinary teams, including scientists, engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel to organize and manage IDP support of NSF-funded fieldwork. The primary responsibility of the IDP Field Support Manager is to provide specialized technical support for U.S. Principal Investigators (PIs) funded by the NSF, including, but not limited to assistance with proposal documentation, project planning, and coordination of logistics with multiple organizations and freight providers. A secondary component of the position involves project management of anywhere from 5 to 15 individual field projects per year, including project planning and financial tracking and reporting. The position will also entail some level of personnel oversight and coordination with regard to IDP's equipment operations staff. While direct engineering or design experience is not required, a basic understanding of equipment designed and maintained by IDP must be achieved.

For more information, including how to apply for the position, read the complete job advertisement at:
https://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/en-us/job/512105/field-support-manager